do you need a seattle traffic lawyer for non-moving violations
If you get a traffic ticket and come to us looking for a Seattle traffic attorney, the first thing we will do is find out what type of traffic ticket you received.

Why do we do this? Because we only help people with moving violations (we’ll get to why that is in a minute).

Before we get to why we only work with moving violations, I want to talk about what specifically a moving violation is.

What is a Moving Violation?

Washington has what is called the Washington Administrative Code (WAC). The WAC lays out the rules for traffic tickets.

WAC 308-104-160 defines which violations are moving and which ones are non-moving. Actually, it doesn’t do that. What it does is describe everything that is a moving violation.

That means if your traffic infraction is not on the list, then it is not a moving violation.

Here is the description straight out of the rule book:

For purposes of RCW 46.20.2891, 46.65.020, and this chapter, the term “moving violation” means any violation of vehicle laws listed in this section that is committed by the driver of a vehicle, while the vehicle is moving. However, being in actual physical control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug is also considered a moving violation for the purposes of this section. Parking violations, equipment violations or paperwork violations relating to insurance, registration, licensing and inspection are considered “nonmoving violations.” Moving violations are those violations included in the following list or violations of substantially similar laws, administrative regulations, local laws, ordinances, regulations, or resolutions of a political subdivision of this state, the federal government, or any other state:

So, what should you take out of that legal mumbo jumbo? Two things:

  1. A moving violation is anything listed in this list; and
  2. Parking tickets, registration, licensing and inspection are non-moving violations.

Now, you are probably wondering what is a moving violation. Well, here’s the list for you (warning, it’s a long list):

Before we get to the list, though, here’s a secret hint. Instead of searching through the list for your infraction just hit the “control” key on your computer and “f” and then type the infraction number into that bar (it starts with “RCW”). If it shows up in this post, then IT IS a moving violation and you should call us.

  1. Driving while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug as defined by RCW 46.61.502;
  2. Physical control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating liquor or any drug, as defined by RCW 46.61.504;
  3. Vehicular homicide, as defined by RCW 46.61.520;
  4. Vehicular assault, as defined by RCW 46.61.522;
  5. Reckless driving, as defined by RCW 46.61.500;
  6. Racing, as defined by RCW 46.61.530;
  7. Embracing, as defined by RCW 46.61.665;
  8. Hit and run (injury, death, striking the body of a deceased person, or occupied vehicle), as defined by RCW 46.52.020;
  9. Attempting to elude a police vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.61.024;
  10. Driving while driving privilege suspended or revoked, as defined by RCW 46.20.342, 46.20.345, or 46.20.394;
  11. Reckless endangerment of roadway workers, as defined in RCW 46.61.527;
  12. Driver under twenty-one driving or being in physical control of a motor vehicle after consuming alcohol, as defined in RCW 46.61.503;
  13. Driving or in physical control of commercial motor vehicle while having alcohol in system, as defined in RCW 46.25.110;
  14. Open container violation (driver), as defined by RCW 46.61.519;
  15. Negligent driving in the first degree, as defined by RCW 46.61.5249;
  16. Negligent driving in the second degree, as defined by RCW 46.61.525 or 46.61.526;
  17. Hit and run (unattended vehicle or property), as defined by RCW 46.52.010;
  18. Disobey road sign, as defined by RCW 46.61.050, 46.61.070, or 46.61.450;
  19. Disobey signalman, officer, or firefighter, as defined by RCW 46.61.015, 46.61.020, 46.61.021, or 46.61.022;
  20. Disobey school patrol, as defined by RCW 46.61.385;
  21. Speed too fast for conditions, as defined by RCW 46.61.400;
  22. Speed in excess of maximum limit, as defined by RCW 46.61.400 or 46.61.460;
  23. Speeding in a school zone, as defined by RCW 46.61.440;
  24. Failure to stop, as defined by RCW 46.61.055, 46.61.065, 46.61.195, 46.61.200, 46.61.340, 46.61.345, 46.61.350, 46.61.365, 46.61.370, or 46.61.375;
  25. Failure to yield right of way, as defined by RCW 46.61.180, 46.61.183, 46.61.185, 46.61.190, 46.61.202, 46.61.205, 46.61.210, 46.61.212, 46.61.215, 46.61.220, 46.61.235, 46.61.245, 46.61.261, 46.61.300, or 46.61.427;
  26. Failure to keep to the right, as defined by RCW 46.61.100 or 46.61.105;
  27. Wrong way on a one-way street or rotary traffic island, as defined by RCW 46.61.135;
  28. Improper lane change or travel, as defined by RCW 46.61.140;
  29. Straddling or driving over centerline, as defined by RCW 46.61.140;
  30. Driving on the wrong side of the road, as defined by RCW 46.61.150;
  31. Crossing divider, as defined by RCW 46.61.150;
  32. Improper entrance to or exit from freeway, as defined by RCW 46.61.155;
  33. Violating restrictions on a limited access highway while driving a motor vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.61.160;
  34. High occupancy vehicle lane violation, as defined by RCW 46.61.165;
  35. Improper overtaking or passing, as defined by RCW 46.61.110, 46.61.115, 46.61.120, 46.61.125, 46.61.130, or 46.61.428;
  36. Passing stopped school bus, as defined by RCW 46.61.370;
  37. Passing stopped private carrier bus, as defined by RCW 46.61.375;
  38. Following too closely, as defined by RCW 46.61.145;
  39. Following fire apparatus, as defined by RCW 46.61.635;
  40. Crossing fire hose, as defined by RCW 46.61.640;
  41. Driving on sidewalk, as defined by RCW 46.61.606;
  42. Driving through safety zone, as defined by RCW 46.61.260;
  43. Driving with wheels off roadway, as defined by RCW 46.61.670;
  44. Impeding traffic, as defined by RCW 46.61.100, 46.61.425, or 46.20.427;
  45. Improper turn, as defined by RCW 46.61.290;
  46. Prohibited turn, as defined by RCW 46.61.295;
  47. Failure to signal or improper signal, as defined by RCW 46.61.305, 46.61.310, or 46.61.315;
  48. Improper backing, as defined by RCW 46.61.605;
  49. Unlawful operation of motorcycle on roadway, as defined by RCW 46.61.608, 46.61.612, or 46.61.614;
  50. Reckless endangerment, as defined by RCW 9A.36.050;
  51. Failure to maintain control, as defined by RCW 46.61.445;
  52. Violation of license restriction(s), as defined by RCW 46.20.041 or 46.20.740;
  53. Violation of instruction permit restrictions, as defined by RCW 46.20.055;
  54. Violation of out-of-service order, as defined by RCW 46.25.090;
  55. Obstructed vision or control, as defined by RCW 46.61.615;
  56. Carrying persons or animals outside of vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.61.660;
  57. Carrying passenger in towed vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.61.625;
  58. Coasting on downgrade, as defined by RCW 46.61.630;
  59. Violation of child restraint requirements, as defined by RCW 46.61.687;
  60. Carrying child under the age of five years old on motorcycle, as defined by RCW 46.37.530;
  61. Carrying passenger improperly on motorcycle, as defined by RCW 46.61.610;
  62. No helmet, goggles, mirrors, windshield or face shield, as defined by RCW 46.37.530;
  63. Operating moped on freeway or sidewalk, as defined by RCW 46.61.710;
  64. Driving without lights, as defined by RCW 46.37.020;
  65. Failure to dim lights, as defined by RCW 46.37.230;
  66. Operating motorcycle without lights, as defined by RCW 46.37.522;
  67. No lamp, reflector, or flag on extended load, as defined by RCW 46.37.140;
  68. Wearing earphones or viewing television in vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.37.480;
  69. Failure to secure load, as defined by RCW 46.37.490;
  70. Spilling load, as defined by RCW 46.61.655;
  71. Improper towing, as defined by RCW 46.44.070;
  72. Using a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a commercial motor vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.61.667 (1)(b); and
  73. Texting while driving a commercial motor vehicle, as defined by RCW 46.61.668 (1)(b).

Why does it matter if it’s a moving violation?

It’s important to know if it’s a moving violation because moving violations are reported to the Department of Licensing. And if it’s reported to the Department of Licensing your insurance company can see it.

The other important consideration is that typically a Seattle traffic attorney won’t handle non-moving violations. The reason is that there simply isn’t much value in hiring a traffic lawyer.

Where we help out the most is keeping your driving record clean. It’s the insurance bump from getting a speeding ticket that hits your pocketbook the hardest, not the traffic fine itself.

If you’ve got a moving violation, the Seattle traffic attorneys at ECLG can help. Call Now to Schedule Your Free Consultation

If you have received a traffic ticket, you only have 15 days to contest the hearing or you lose automatically. Don’t wait, get experienced professionals on the job immediately. Let us handle this for you from start to finish.

Call us now at 206.973.0407 to schedule your free consultation. I guarantee you won’t be disappointed.

Christopher Small is the co-founder and owner of Emerald City Law Group, a full service speeding ticket law firm.